World Blood Donor Day is celebrated on 14 June every year. This year’s theme is “Every blood donor is a hero.”

Did you know? Half a litre of donated blood can help save as many as three people’s lives. Join “everyday heroes” – fire fighters, police, rescue workers – and give blood.

Contact your nearest blood centre, blood bank, hospital, clinic.

Over 180 countries across the world are participating in the first-ever World Immunization Week.
The WHO-led initiative, which takes place from 21-28 April 2012, aims to raise awareness and encourage people everywhere to protect themselves and their families against vaccine-preventable diseases. It is also a time to focus on the fact that in this rapidly globalizing world, disease outbreaks can affect communities everywhere.

Over 180 countries across the world are participating in the first-ever World Immunization Week.

The WHO-led initiative, which takes place from 21-28 April 2012, aims to raise awareness and encourage people everywhere to protect themselves and their families against vaccine-preventable diseases. It is also a time to focus on the fact that in this rapidly globalizing world, disease outbreaks can affect communities everywhere.

Wednesday, 25 April, is World Malaria Day, which this year marks a decisive juncture in the history of malaria control. Whether the malaria map will keep shrinking, as it has in the past decade, or be reclaimed by the malaria parasites, depends, to a great extent, on the resources that will be invested in control efforts over the next years. 

Send a net, save a life with Nothing But Nets
Roll Back Malaria campaign

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon video message:

Last year we mourned the fact that one child died every 45 seconds from this disease. This year, we have managed to slow the clock. It remains a monumental tragedy that one child dies every minute from malaria, but we can draw some hope from the many lives saved through international interventions.

Wednesday, 25 April, is World Malaria Day, which this year marks a decisive juncture in the history of malaria control. Whether the malaria map will keep shrinking, as it has in the past decade, or be reclaimed by the malaria parasites, depends, to a great extent, on the resources that will be invested in control efforts over the next years. 

Send a net, save a life with Nothing But Nets

Roll Back Malaria campaign

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon video message:

Last year we mourned the fact that one child died every 45 seconds from this disease. This year, we have managed to slow the clock. It remains a monumental tragedy that one child dies every minute from malaria, but we can draw some hope from the many lives saved through international interventions.

The world has met the Millennium Development Goal (MDGs) target of halving the proportion of people without access to safe drinking water, according to a report issued today by UNICEF and the World Health Organization (WHO). Between 1990 and 2010, over two billion people gained access to improved drinking water sources, such as piped supplies and protected wells.

The successful efforts to provide greater access to drinking water are a testament to all who see the MDGs not as a dream, but as a vital tool for improving the lives of millions of the poorest people.
Ban Ki-moon

Report full text (PDF)
Op-ed in The Guardian by Sanjay Wijesekera, Chief of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene for UNICEF
Millennium Development Goals: Goal 7

The world has met the Millennium Development Goal (MDGs) target of halving the proportion of people without access to safe drinking water, according to a report issued today by UNICEF and the World Health Organization (WHO). Between 1990 and 2010, over two billion people gained access to improved drinking water sources, such as piped supplies and protected wells.

The successful efforts to provide greater access to drinking water are a testament to all who see the MDGs not as a dream, but as a vital tool for improving the lives of millions of the poorest people.

Ban Ki-moon

Report full text (PDF)

Op-ed in The Guardian by Sanjay Wijesekera, Chief of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene for UNICEF

Millennium Development Goals: Goal 7

Just released! World Malaria Report 2011 from the World Health Organization which analyses prevention and control measures and highlights continued progress towards global anti-malaria targets. The report shows clear progress in the fight against malaria and a decline in estimated malaria cases and deaths. For the first time, the report contains individual profiles for 99 countries with ongoing malaria transmission.

Just released! World Malaria Report 2011 from the World Health Organization which analyses prevention and control measures and highlights continued progress towards global anti-malaria targets. The report shows clear progress in the fight against malaria and a decline in estimated malaria cases and deaths. For the first time, the report contains individual profiles for 99 countries with ongoing malaria transmission.

Did you know that largely preventable non-communicable diseases — cancer, diabetes, lung and heart disease, strokes — kill three out of five people who die every year? We know the problems and the solutions are affordable, but they require action from everyone. Find out more in this video from the World Health Organization (WHO).

United Nations High-level Meeting on Noncommunicable Disease Prevention and Control (19-20 September 2011)

Attention photographers!  Find out about the Images to Stop Tuberculosis Photo Award.  Entries are due by 20 July 2011.

Tuberculosis is a contagious, airborne disease that continues to kill  thousands of people every single day though preventable and treatable.  Tuberculosis is a disease of poverty, affecting mostly adults in their  most productive years. It damages economies, destroys families, and is  keeping millions of people in poverty. Tuberculosis also is a leading  killer among people living with HIV.

Attention photographers!  Find out about the Images to Stop Tuberculosis Photo Award.  Entries are due by 20 July 2011.

Tuberculosis is a contagious, airborne disease that continues to kill thousands of people every single day though preventable and treatable. Tuberculosis is a disease of poverty, affecting mostly adults in their most productive years. It damages economies, destroys families, and is keeping millions of people in poverty. Tuberculosis also is a leading killer among people living with HIV.