11 July is World Population Day! This year’s focus is on investing in young people. Today’s 1.8 billion young people are shaping social and economic realities, challenging norms and values, and building the foundation of the world’s future. Yet too many young people continue to grapple with poverty, inequality and human rights violations that prevent them from reaching their personal and collective potential.  “The solution lies in investments in health, education, training and employment for young people. This will improve prospects for their lives and our common future,” said Ban Ki-moon about the Day.


11 July is World Population Day!

This year’s focus is on investing in young people. Today’s 1.8 billion young people are shaping social and economic realities, challenging norms and values, and building the foundation of the world’s future. Yet too many young people continue to grapple with poverty, inequality and human rights violations that prevent them from reaching their personal and collective potential.

“The solution lies in investments in health, education, training and employment for young people. This will improve prospects for their lives and our common future,” said Ban Ki-moon about the Day.

This week the World Health Organization (WHO) declared a global health emergency to stem a potential resurgence of polio, after the preventable disease spread in countries where it was once eradicated.  “If unchecked, this situation could result in failure to eradicate globally one of the world’s most serious vaccine preventable diseases,” said WHO’s Emergency Committee.  Get 10 facts on polio eradication.

This week the World Health Organization (WHO) declared a global health emergency to stem a potential resurgence of polio, after the preventable disease spread in countries where it was once eradicated.

“If unchecked, this situation could result in failure to eradicate globally one of the world’s most serious vaccine preventable diseases,” said WHO’s Emergency Committee.

Get 10 facts on polio eradication.


Steady progress has been made in saving mothers’ lives, with a 45% reduction in maternal deaths since 1990, according to new UN data. However, more than 800 women still die every day due to complications in pregnancy and childbirth. Sub-Saharan Africa is still the most dangerous place in the world to have a baby, where a woman’s risk of dying during pregnancy and childbirth is 1 in 40, compared to 1 in 3300 in Europe. Find out more here from the World Health Organization (WHO).

Steady progress has been made in saving mothers’ lives, with a 45% reduction in maternal deaths since 1990, according to new UN data.

However, more than 800 women still die every day due to complications in pregnancy and childbirth.

Sub-Saharan Africa is still the most dangerous place in the world to have a baby, where a woman’s risk of dying during pregnancy and childbirth is 1 in 40, compared to 1 in 3300 in Europe.

Find out more here from the World Health Organization (WHO).

A new report by the World Health Organization (WHO) states that antibiotic resistance – when bacteria change so antibiotics no longer work in people who need them to treat infections – is now a major threat to public health.“Without urgent, coordinated action by many stakeholders, the world is headed for a post-antibiotic era, in which common infections and minor injuries which have been treatable for decades can once again kill,” says Dr Keiji Fukuda, WHO’s Assistant Director-General for Health Security. This report starts a global effort led by WHO to address drug resistance.

A new report by the World Health Organization (WHO) states that antibiotic resistance – when bacteria change so antibiotics no longer work in people who need them to treat infections – is now a major threat to public health.

“Without urgent, coordinated action by many stakeholders, the world is headed for a post-antibiotic era, in which common infections and minor injuries which have been treatable for decades can once again kill,” says Dr Keiji Fukuda, WHO’s Assistant Director-General for Health Security. 

This report starts a global effort led by WHO to address drug resistance.

Monday is the World Day for Safety and Health at Work, this year focusing on the use of chemicals at work. 
Chemicals are key to healthy living and modern convenience. According to the International Labour Organization (ILO), governments, employers and workers continue to struggle to control exposure to these chemicals in the workplace, as well as limit emissions to the environment.

Monday is the World Day for Safety and Health at Work, this year focusing on the use of chemicals at work. 

Chemicals are key to healthy living and modern convenience. According to the International Labour Organization (ILO), governments, employers and workers continue to struggle to control exposure to these chemicals in the workplace, as well as limit emissions to the environment.




Immunize for a healthy future: Know, Check, Protect.

This is the message of this year’s World Immunization Week, on 24-30 April.

Have a look at this short video which encourages you to ask your local health clinic which vaccines you need, check whether your vaccinations are up-to-date, and to get the vaccines you need, when you need them.

Share this from the World Health Organization (WHO) and help spread the word!